In the O.R. with Reiki

Updated: Oct 8, 2020

As a Certified Medical Reiki Master, I am passionate about sharing Reiki as a holistic, complementary therapy for patients and their caregivers.   We do not diagnose conditions, prescribe or perform medical treatments, nor do we interfere with the treatment of a licensed medical professional. The mission of a Certified Medical Reiki Master, is to support the patient and/or caregiver in a nurturing holistic way during what is often a very difficult and challenging time. During this time, Reiki  is used to relieve stress, pain, and tension, and promote healing, by helping people become energetically balanced physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually.  Pleasant and relaxing, Reiki is often used for personal wellness. Reiki treatments are one of the top three complementary in-patient therapies offered in over 800 US hospitals, including: Johns Hopkins, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Harvard, Yale, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, George Washington University, Boston Children’s Hospital, as well as Wounded Warrior Programs and Hospice.  Our sole responsibility when a patient is in surgery, is to the patient. We assist, by sending healing energy throughout the procedure, and we also give Reiki sessions both pre and post op, to the patient and their loved ones, who await the surgery outcome. Medical Reiki can bring comfort to a doctor's Patient, helping them to manage their stress and to remain calm - things that are important to a doctor.

It is not unusual for someone awaiting surgery to be so calm because of the power of Reiki that they fall asleep in pre-op. The doctors notice the difference and love how soothed their Patients are. Medical Reiki helps to maintain steady and safe blood pressure levels during the operation; brings peace to the entire surgery team; shortens the time needed to complete the surgery; and can produce remarkable unexpected results. A huge benefit as told by patients, is that Medical Reiki eliminates the need for loads of pain medications within a day or two following surgery.


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